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  • June 30, 2015

Hope’s Captures Another Preservation Award for its 2nd Pearl Harbor Project

Hope’s Captures Another Preservation Award for its 2nd Pearl Harbor Project

Hope’s Captures Another Preservation Award for its 2nd Pearl Harbor Project 635 454 Hope's Windows, Inc.

Built in 1908, Building 9 Undergoes Historic Renovation with Hope’s One55™ Series Steel Windows

For the second year in a row, Hope’s® has received the Preservation Honor Award from the Historic Hawaii Foundation for a historic renovation project at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard.

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Building 9 was furnished with Hope’s One55™ Series custom-handcrafted solid, hot-rolled steel windows designed to Anti-Terrorism Force Protection (ATFP) standards.

The product name, One55 Series, originated from a previous Pearl Harbor project, Building 155. That project encompassed the installation of Hope’s windows and received a Preservation Honor Award from the same foundation in 2014.

U.S. Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Building 9 completed 1913

Building 9 has three stories plus a basement level with a total of 83,440 sq. ft. of space. The footprint is approximately 60 ft. x 400 ft.

Built as a storage facility in 1908, and expanded in 1912, the structure is considered an important historic building of early Shipyard construction, as it was the only general storehouse of permanent construction until 1918. It is now used for office space.

“We wanted a true replication of the building’s original windows and Hope’s was the only manufacturer that had a window cross section that matched,” says Lorraine Minatoishi, Ph.D., AIA, President of Minatoishi Architects, based in Honolulu, Hawaii. Minatoishi served as the Historic Architect for the Building 9 project. “They came out to the site, took portions of the window back with them to their factory in Jamestown, New York, and replicated the window’s size and proportion. They also matched the original color of the window.”

Aerial view of Pearl Harbor Navy Yard 17, circa 1913
U.S. Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Building 9 elevator and railroad construction, circa 1918
U.S. Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Building 9 roll doors detail, north elevation, circa 1918

The original windows included steel pivoted ventilators surrounded by fixed glass lites. For this preservation project, due to Building 9 now being fully air-conditioned, fixed windows only were required. To maintain the historic look, simulated ventilators were installed as was textured and obscured glazing to match the originals.

“Our team worked closely with Minatoishi Architects to ensure the window design would meet current construction standards while maintaining the narrow sightlines and intricate profiles of the existing steel windows,” says Randy Manitta, President and CEO of Hope’s. “Hope’s is privileged to have a role in preserving a hallowed location in American history.”

U.S. Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. June 6, 1918 - General Storehouse, Building 9A, looking east

Minatoishi says her firm had nothing but a good experience working with Hope’s.

“Hope’s is extremely service oriented and professional,” says Minatoishi. “We had no problems with the windows and the entire process.”

Alex Viernes of WCIT Architecture in Honolulu was the Project Architect/Manager for the Building 9 project.

U.S. Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. October 5, 1918. Commissary Store and Office Interior view looking north

Historic photos courtesy of The United States Navy

Before and After image from the previous Hope’s project at Pearl Harbor. Hope’s created a new product line for the historic Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard/Intermediate Maintenance Facility’s (PHNSY/IMF) Building 155: the Hope’s One55™ Series Steel Windows (the same product line used in Building 9). The Building 155 preservation project was completed September 2013.

Before/After photo: Danielle Jones, Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard/Intermediate Maintenance Facility

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